The Easy Way to Touch Up Paint

If you’ve been following along with our blog, you’ll notice a trend.  Embarrassingly, I’ve admitted over and over again that we have some open projects to complete.  One of those projects was the need to do some touch up paint throughout our RV.

We are extremely happy with our Nuvo Cabinet paint but drawers get slammed and they rub when you’re lifting them to pull out, (which is standard for RVs).  6 people living in 300 square feet  dictates that paint WILL be scuffed and need touch up paint here and there.

Touch Up Paint Can Be Easy

The task of opening a paint can, mixing it, and getting out a brush that will need to be cleaned up is too messy.  I don’t want brush strokes and I want this touch up paint to be as painless as possible.  Enter Shur-Line touch up painter (I have no affiliation with this product or brand – just my opinion).

Touch up paint the easy way

I have to admit that Pinterest was once again my inspiration for this product.  These rubbermaid paint sticks looked promising to alleviate my issues mentioned above.  But I couldn’t find the Rubbermaid ones locally.  Instead I found the Shur-Line Touch Up Painters at our local Lowes for about $8.  The roller refills were just under $4.

To get my paint into the Paint Stick without pouring all over the counter, I used a funnel.

Now here is my word of caution.  Please listen to me friend…

You see how this painter is squeezable?

Shur Line Touch Up Painter

Pretty nifty huh?

Um…yes, it is neat.  But please proceed with caution.  I love that it is squeezable, don’t get me wrong.  It’s a great feature but you MUST practice restraint.  It is possible to be overzealous in your squeezing which WILL result in drips.  (I had to do a bit of cleanup which is an entirely different matter)

Basically, you squeeze a little and roll a little.  This little baby is very convenient and I was pleased with the results.

Now in the interest of full disclosure, Mark did NOT care for this roller.  I think it was because he squeezed too hard.  He’s strong.

And you, my friend, have been warned.

When You’re Done…

Near the roller part of the painter, you’ll see “Apply Paint”.  If you rotate the top 180 degrees it clicks to close.  This function seals the touch up painter to stop the paint from drying up.

We finally painted the plywood panel that sits behind TV we installed.  The railing for the top of our closet bunk now matches the rest of the bunks.  And last but not least our cabinets and walls are fresh and the chipped and scuffed paint is as good as new.

IF you can control yourself, this little tool is sweet and makes touch ups a breeze.

Spice Organization Solutions

Preparing meals for 6 people in a tiny kitchen is a challenge!  Fitting all that you need to prepare those meals is interesting.  Today I’m sharing with you my spice organization solutions for my tiny kitchen. Every little bit of space you can save is huge!

Spice Organization Solutions

Spice Organization Solutions

Previously I shared about our zero gravity wall-mount spice rack.  It worked great and I loved it but we have so much less wall space in our remodeled ’96 Winnebago, I needed to find other spice organization solutions.

Stamped Spice Jars

Stamped Spice Jars

I buy bulk spices, even with my limited space.  But what to do with such big quantities of spices?

I bought smaller glass jars for spices I use more frequently.  The large plastic containers I bought the bulk spices in are stored in the back of very inaccessible, deep, narrow cabinet for refilling as needed.

But back to those glass jars…

If you decide to buy jars at Hobby Lobby, wait till glass is 50% off to save quite a bit of money.

The metal punch set came from Pick Your Plum. The deal is over but they do repeat their offerings from time to time. You can also buy a punch kit from Amazon. Mine is 1/8″ tall, to do over, I’d get a bigger punch kit to make the wording more readable.

metal-punches

To stamp the lid, I used a block of wood and set the lid on top and firmly pressing it against the wood block. Then I gave 2 HARD taps on the punch with my hammer for each letter.

Some of my lids are not the prettiest for 2 reasons:

  1. I didn’t start out using the block to keep the metal surrounding the punched letter from warping.
  2. I didn’t hammer hard enough and had to use the punch several more times to get the impression.

Basil turned out the best and that was toward the end of my learning curve on figuring the metal punch process out on my own.

spice-drawer

After I punched the name on the lid, I colored the lettering in with sharpie. I let the marker dry and then wiped away the excess with a paper towel. I store these spices snug in a drawer in the kitchen.  I have my other odds and ends spices that fill in the empty space.

On the smaller jars that are not metal, I write the name of the spice on the lid with a sharpie. I tell you, anything to save me from having to search around for the right spice.

Clearly I need to buy several more jars for spices.  But the nearest Hobby Lobby is in Pensacola and we rarely get there But just like every other unfinished project in the camper, it will get done someday. 🙂

Recipe Box Spices

Recipe Box Spices

There are spices that I rarely use but I still want to keep. For instance, I had some sprinkles for cookie and cake decorating with the kids. I don’t want to take up a bunch of space because I rarely use them and don’t need large quantities. I found the most compact way to store these spices was to use a recipe card box and empty TicTac boxes.

To make my Recipe Box Spice organizer, I bought the value pack of TicTacs from the local warehouse store (Sam’s Club).

For the labels, I sprayed a sheet of Avery labels (they are the smallest return address labels you can buy # 5267/8167) with chalkboard spray paint.

Labels for Recipe Box Spices

I’m a sloppy DIYer and the package still has remnants of the chalkboard spray.

To mark my chalk labels, I used a chalk pen which is way less mess than regular chalk.  Bonus on the chalk pen is that the writing doesn’t rub off unless it gets wet.

With this recipe box spice organizer, I can fit 12 spices in a very compact space.

 

That is it friends, the two best spice storage solutions I’ve found our tiny kitchen.

Homemade Makeup Remover Wipes

When I wrote about my homemade baby wipes, a reader tipped me off to the possibility of using the homemade wipes as makeup remover wipes.  I love her!  I don’t know her but I love her!

Since she mentioned it to me, I’d been using the homemade baby wipes for removing my makeup.  Now I’ve reworked the recipe and have my very own homemade makeup remover wipes that is perfect for removing stubborn waterproof makeup.
First I added more coconut oil because my skin is dry and the oil is helpful in removing waterproof mascara.  I also make smaller batches because I don’t like my wipes to sit for several months wet.
Homemade Makeup Remover Wipes
Since we live in an RV and bathroom space is at a premium, I bought a smaller sealable container from Dollar Tree.  I replaced the half roll of Bounty paper towels with Bounty napkins, (I promise Bounty is not paying me).  I chose Bounty because that particular brand just works better and doesn’t fall apart after sitting in the solution for several weeks.
IMG_2012
And here is my recipe…

Homemade Makeup Remover Wipes

Sealable Container
Bounty Napkins
1/2 c. warm water
1 Tbsp coconut oil
1/2 Tbsp baby wash (you can also use a mild facial cleanser)
Adjust your batch size as needed.
Place napkins in a resealable container.  In a separate bowl, mix the water, coconut oil, and baby wash.  Stir gently and pour over napkins.  Store in a the sealed container.
That’s it, easy peasy!

Dry Baby Wipes Recipe

There was such a great response to my post about how I make my Homemade Baby Wipes, today I decided to revisit the topic and share my dry baby wipes recipe.

First things first though, I’d like to address concerns over molding with the original homemade baby wipes.

From my experience in the 2 plus years of using my homemade baby wipes almost exclusively, I’ve never once had mold.  I do understand the concern though.

So for those of you that want a fail-safe, here are some solutions for you.

  • Add a few drops of Tea Tree Oil or Lavender Essential Oil to your wipe solution.
  • Use distilled water instead of tap water.
  • Use a homemade dry baby wipe.

Dry baby wipes?!

Some companies have started putting out baby wipes that are dry and you simply need to add water to them.  Since I’m going for chemical free and non-toxic, I have a method that is really quite simple and works nicely with either washable cloth wipes, napkins, or paper towels.  I like options!

Homemade Dry Baby Wipes ~ TheNewLighterLife.com

Homemade Dry Baby Wipes

  • Spray Bottle
  • 1 c. distilled water
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2-3 drops of Tea Tree Oil or Lavendar Essential Oil
  • 1 Tbsp witch hazel
  • 1 Tbsp baby wash

Pour all of the ingredients into a spray bottle and gently shake.

When you need to use a wipe, shake the spray bottle solution (since the oil will separate – see below) and spray the cloth or paper towel until saturated.

 

Dry Baby Wipes Spray Bottle

Ingredients

Now let’s talk about a couple of different ingredients.

Dry Baby Wipe Ingredients

Olive Oil. Since coconut oil solidifies, and this is a spray solution we have to replace it with olive oil.

Witch Hazel. The witch hazel is added to the solution because of it’s anti-microbial properties (and we no longer have coconut oil in our mix).  Witch hazel is also an anti-inflamatory and known to be soothing to the skin.  Translation – it’s good for diaper rashes – bonus.

Tea Tree Oil & Lavender Essential Oil. Because of this article, many parents are concerned about using either tea tree oil or lavender in a wipes solution for little boys.  You have to decide if you are comfortable with using either one. But I will say, I appreciate this post from TheSmartMama.  Basically, there were only a handful of boys affected and there could have been a multiple of factors that contributed to gynecomastia, (breast enlargement).  Given how many parents use tea tree oil and lavender essential oil on their children, you would expect to see much more gynecomastia.  But follow your gut instinct.

Paper Towels.  If you opt to use disposable wipes, you can use whatever brand of paper towels your heart desires.  The reason I had previously recommended Bounty was because it is very durable and can hold up to sitting in a wet solution without falling apart.  With your homemade dry baby wipes, you don’t need to be concerned about durability.

Conclusion

This wipe solution is a great option for traveling and it’s convenient.  I use little pump spray bottle and stores it easily in my purse.  This particular spray bottle has a little slider that locks it from spraying, I bought it at Dollar Tree.

For travel, I just tuck napkins and the spray in my purse.  If I run out of napkins, I just use a paper towel.

If you’ve tried them, I’d love to know what you think.  Not conventional, but they do the job and they do it well.

How to Install a Flat Screen TV in a Motorhome

Today I’m sharing with you how to install a flat screen TV in a Motorhome.

If you’ve followed along with our Camper Remodel, you know everything inside the camper was from the 90’s.  The box TV was no exception.

We’re not big TV watchers but we decided we wanted to upgrade to a flat screen so we could receive digital channels without a digital receiver box.

First things first, Mark took off the front plastic plate and  removed the TV.

He cut 2X4’s to build an “H” Frame that could fit into the cubby hole.  He screwed that frame to the built-in existing metal frame that was inside the cubby.
h-frame-for-installing-a-flat-screen-in-an-RV
Next he took a piece of plywood and cut it to the measurements to fit over the TV opening.  The purpose of the plywood is for it to be a mounting piece.  Since there is not a wall to attach the TV to, Mark had to build one. He used a jigsaw to cut an opening so he could run the cords through the opening for power and hookups.
installing-a-flat-panel-tv-in-a-camper
That plywood face was screwed into the “H” that Mark made.
Next, the plastic frame was re-installed over the plywood face
flat-panel-install-on-remodeled-rv
The flat screen came with a mounting bracket so Mark screwed that into the “drywall” mounting piece.
stock flat screen bracket
Mark mounted the TV to the mounting bracket and it was securely attached to the cubby hole.
Now this worked great as far as stability, but the TV’s position and lack of tilt was annoying.  When anyone would sit in the side chair, the glare from the TV made it so the picture was not visible.
So we bought a swivel/tilt wall mount at Target for around $60.
swivel tilt wall mount for camper tvThe old bracket had to be removed and the new mount was screwed onto the plywood.  The position of the swivel was lowered due to that cutout for cords and because the TV would have sat too high on the cubby.
swivel tilt mount installed to replace old tv
Now we need to finally paint our plywood.  Someday.
how to install a flat screen tv in a motorhome

RV Bunk Remodel ~ Turning a Class A Master Bedroom in a Bunkroom

Today I’m going to show you how we accomplished our RV Bunk Remodel in our 96′ Winnebago.

We had to do something when we downsized and sold our 5th Wheel.  When we looked at our more frugal option of buying a Class A, we ran into a common problem.  No bunks.

Sure some Class A’s had bunks, but none that could accommodate 4 kids or that were in our price range.  So what is a frugal family to do?  Remodel.

Continue Reading

Deco Mirror Redo

True to 90’s fashion, our 96′ Winnebago Adventurer had some ugly brass deco mirrors.  Thankfully, there were only 2 and they were in the bathroom.  These mirrors were in desperate need of a redo.  I figured out you could scrape the frosted look off with a razor blade.  But after that, I was stuck.

remaking-90s-copper-paneled-rv-mirror

So our 2 doors sat with the faux bronze for several months.  Continue Reading